Dr. Suzanne Gildert

Dr. Suzanne Gildert

Faculty

Robotics, AI

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Areas of Expertise

Quantum Computing  •  Artificial Intelligence  •  Ethics  •  Robotics

About Suzanne

Suzanne is co-founder of Sanctuary AI, a company with a mission to build synthetic humans – “synths” – that are indistinguishable from us physically, cognitively and emotionally. Sanctuary is structured to explore both cutting edge technology and the ethical issues that arise from creating human-like machines.

Prior to Sanctuary, Suzanne founded Kindred Inc., an artificial intelligence and robotics company. She hand built over 30 robots to demonstrate Kindred’s core technology concept of human robot tele-operation for reinforcement learning. She grew the company to over 50 employees and opened offices in Vancouver, Toronto, and San Mateo. She helped raise over $50M in venture funding for Kindred from top tier investors including Eclipse, Google Ventures, First Round Capital and Data Collective.

Suzanne holds a PhD in Physics and Electronics from the University of Birmingham, UK

Should Robots Have Rights?

Kindred AI: Non-Biological Sentiences are on the Horizon

part 1 of 6 Adiabatic Quantum Computing talk

AGI and Embodiment

Foundation In Exponentials: Robotics

AIs in Human-Like Bodies: Virtues and Challenges

Robots: Technology and Implications | SingularityU Nordic Summit 2018

Learning About Humans Through Robots - SingularityU Canada Summit 2019

Speaking Topics

  • AI in Human-Like Bodies: Technology and Implications

    Throughout the entirety of human history, we have been captivated by the idea of creating machines that are like us. Human-like robots have appeared in endless science fiction movies, often in dystopian narratives involving conflict between biological and non-biological life. Recent advancements in hardware technologies such as improved sensors, batteries, actuators, and 3D printing can allow us to realize the dream of building human-like robots. Meanwhile, advancements in machine learning and AI are enabling the minds of such robots to become increasingly human-like. Over the next couple of decades, there will be positive and negative impacts to life and society as highly intelligent, sentient robot life comes online. This talk will describe how machines that look, move, and think like us may soon emerge. It will focus on the breakthroughs that are enabling AI minds to become more and more indistinguishable from human intelligence. It will also address some of the social, economic, and ethical questions that arise from these breakthroughs.

  • Is it too Early for Robot Rights?

    What does a future that includes robots as co-workers, friends, and perhaps even family look and feel like? How are we ensuring that this new “class” is integrated into our societies with respect and empathy? And what about those who worry about a robotic invasion or overlord, how can we ensure that humans feel safe to expand our view of humanity? Is this something we are ready to imagine? This talk focuses on the core issues of empathy, ethics, and rights as we move into a future reality that includes robots as an upgrade to our shared civilization.

  • Next-generation AI: Technology and implications

    Throughout the entirety of human history, we have been captivated by the idea of creating machines that are like us. Human-like robots have appeared in endless science fiction movies, often in dystopian narratives involving conflict between biological and non-biological life. Recent advancements in hardware technologies such as improved sensors, batteries, actuators and 3D printing are allowing us to realize the dream of building human-like robots. Meanwhile, advancements in machine learning and AI are enabling the minds of such robots to become increasingly human-like. Over the next couple of decades there will be positive and negative impacts to life and society as highly intelligent, sentient robot life comes online. This talk will describe how machines that look, move, and think like us may soon emerge. It will focus on the breakthroughs that are enabling AI minds to become more and more indistinguishable from human intelligence. It will also address some of the social, economic and ethical questions that arise from these breakthroughs.

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